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OSTI 2022

Conference

Words = a Pathway to Peace

September 10, 2022 - Pre-Conference Kick Off!

September 14 - 15, 2022 - Opening Night & Events

September 16 -18, 2022 - Main Conference

*All times listed are in Pacific Time

Speaker Bios & Session Abstracts

Friday 9/16/2022 - Main Conference, Day 1


Session 402


Dr. Yasmin Alkashef

Is Your Interpreting Style as Unique as Your Fingerprint? Interpreters’ Styles Across Interpreting Modes

Bio

Yasmin Alkashef is is an ATA-certified Arabic>English translator, certified healthcare interpreter (CHI), registered court interpreter, and conference interpreter originally from Cairo, Egypt. Alkashef has finished an MA and a PhD in translation and interpreting studies at Ain Shams University. She taught translation and English as a second language at Ain Shams University and the American University in Cairo. Now based in Oregon, she teaches interpreting at NYU and UMass. Her interests include translation, interpreting, interpreter training, localization, and cultural consultancy.

Session Abstract

Studies on interpreters’ style suggest that interpreters adopt global and local strategies that formulate their unique style. This presentation focuses on the findings from a recent empirical study on how consistent an interpreter’s style can be in the simultaneous and consecutive modes. Subjects are asked to interpret one long speech, consecutively in the first half and simultaneously in the second. By comparing the interpreters’ output in both modes, interesting observations are made about the interpreters’ unique style and how they employ the different global and local strategies. The findings also have implications for interpreters, interpreting trainers and trainees.

Session 403


Yana Ellis

Prosody in Prose Challenges for the Translator

Bio

Yana Ellis is a Bulgarian-born freelance translator and Modern foreign languages teacher based in the UK. She holds an MA in Translation from the University of Bristol. She translates from German and Bulgarian into English and is drawn to narratives that explore issues of identity, immigration, and the representation of the ‘other’.

Session Abstract

The presentation is based on a case study translation of Berlin, Moskau Eine Reise zu Fuß by Wolfgang Büscher, exploring how one translator's desire to understand and come closer to the 'other' and share their own reading experience influence rendering those features in a text that constitute its aesthetic function through rhythm, balance, and contrasts of sentences.

Session 404


Giovanna Carriero Contreras

Understanding Implicit Bias for Translators and Interpreters

Bio

For over 30 years, Giovanna Carriero-Contreras has been a noteworthy leader in the language industry. She is a published language industry author, trainer, and national/international speaker. She co-authored The Community Interpreter© and The Medical Interpreter programs. She is a member of the ASTM Committee F43 on Language Services and Products, member of the Technical Committee for the revision of F2089-15 Standard Practice for Language Interpreting, Chief of US Delegation for the ISO/TC 37/SC 5 for translation, interpreting, and related technology standards, and editor of on the revision of ISO Standard 13611:2014 Interpreting — Guidelines for community interpreting. She sits on the Advocacy Committee and the Language Access Committee of the Association of Language Companies (ALC) and is incoming Chair (May 2022) of the American Association of Translators and Interpreters in Education.

Giovanna Carriero-Contreras is the CEO of Cesco Linguistic Services, a company she conceptualized and launched as a foreign language agency and a conduit between Colorado's Limited English Proficiency residents and the service providers who tend to the needs of this growing population. Cesco provides linguistic services to many of the well-known and respected Colorado businesses in the legal, medical, insurance, workers compensation and community-based industries; leads and manages a pool of over 200 language professionals covering a wide range of languages from the most common to languages of lesser-diffusion. Since 2014, Cesco has conducted business nationally and internationally.

Giovanna was honored with the 2020 Bill Daniels Ethical Leader of the Year Award for her unwavering commitment to principle-based ethics in business despite and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic to promote language access for Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals.

In addition to her role as Cesco’s Founder and CEO, Giovanna serves as Colorado’s Honorary Consul to Italy. She holds a BA from the Institute Universitario Orientale, Naples, Italy. She is a graduate of the School of Translation and Interpretation in Geneva, Switzerland; she speaks English, Italian, French and Spanish. She has held positions in Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Session Abstract

As individuals, we build our sense of identity through our experiences at the personal, collective, social, and professional level. Every single experience we have shapes who we are, how we feel, and how we (re)act in one way or another, regardless of how big or small they may be.

The development of our social and professional identity is influenced by many elements, but as individuals, we can choose how we respond to those elements. Consciously or unconsciously, we draw on knowledge and experiences stemming from our personal background and history. Our personal history inevitably shapes the way we think and work; and if we are not careful, it may negatively impact our behavior in a professional setting.

As interpreters, when we are unaware of how our previous experiences can condition us to (re)act in professional settings, learning how to identify our implicit biases becomes paramount. When we are aware of our own biases, then we can learn strategies to monitor and counteract our biases so that we deliver services that follow professional ethics and standards of practice.

During this session you’ll learn what these various identities are, how they overlap, how they differ, and how they can impact the interpreting encounter.

Session 405 (*Spanish*)


Ángel Rull

Gestión Emocional en el trabajo: Cómo funcionan nuestras emociones y cómo podemos manejarlas

Handling Emotions on the Job for Interpreters and Translators: How Emotions Work and How to Manage Yours

Bio

Ángel vive en Madrid y es Licenciado en Psicología. Está especializado en manejo y gestión emocional. También está capacitado en modelos de tratamiento psicológico de Psicología Positiva y en Autoestima. Desde un enfoque multidisciplinar, trabaja con los pacientes dotando a la persona de herramientas ajustadas a las necesidades de cada problema. Durante su carrera profesional se ha orientado al trabajo clínico, pero también a la divulgación de la Psicología colaborando con diferentes medios españoles. Actualmente utiliza modelos emocionales integrados en la terapia para un mejor abordaje del problema. Dentro de la orientación cognitivo-conductual, integra elementos de la Psicología Positiva, el trabajo con autoestima y las habilidades emocionales. De esta forma, puede ayudar mejor a la persona a través de una perspectiva más amplia.

Ángel lives in Madrid and has a degree in Psychology. He specializes in in emotional management. He is also trained in Positive Psychology and Self-Esteem psychological treatment models. He works with patients from a multidisciplinary approach, providing them with tools tailored to their needs. During his professional career, he has focused on clinical work, but also on the dissemination of psychology, collaborating with different Spanish media. He currently uses integrated emotional models in therapy to better address the problem. Within the cognitive-behavioral orientation, he integrates elements of Positive Psychology, work with self-esteem and emotional skills. In this way, he can better help the person through a broader perspective.

Session Abstract

Las emociones son una parte olvidada de lo que somos. Creemos que actúan como reacciones y que no siempre es posible manejarlas. Sin embargo, diariamente sentimos y toda emoción tiene un fin muy claro: alcanzar una estructura positiva. Sin entender esto y sin saber cómo podríamos aplicarlo, estamos anclados a una realidad psicológica que nos puede causar malestar. Esto es especialmente importante en una profesión donde hay una relación diaria con las emociones de otras personas. Vamos a ver qué emociones tenemos y qué recursos nos ofrecen para el día a día.

Emotions are a forgotten part of who we are. We think emotions are a reaction and that it is not always possible to manage them. However, we experience emotions daily. Every emotion has a specific purpose: to reach a positive state of being. Often, we remain stuck in a psychological reality that only makes us feel uneasy, without even understanding or putting into practice our emotions. This is particularly important in a profession where we experience daily interactions with others’ emotions. In this presentation, we will learn about emotions we experience and explore the resources they provide each day.

Session 407


Ana Soler

Lesser-Known Disorders: Knowledge Bridge for Medical, Educational, and Legal Interpreters and Translators

Bio

Ana Soler is the Chairperson of the National Association of Educational Translators and Interpreters of Spoken Languages (NAETISL: https://naetisl.org/) and Founder of SeSo, Inc., a source of qualified and trained interpreters, and cultural humility - family engagement workshops for school districts. She completed her degree in Social Work at Georgia State University, her Master’s Degree in Public Health at Emory University, and is a Ph.D. in Special Education student at the University of Georgia. For over a decade, Ana worked with the largest school district in Georgia as the Language Services and Parent Outreach Coordinator, developing, implementing and evaluating professional development opportunities for multilingual personnel, as well as discovering endless opportunities to engage multilingual families in their children’s education. Ana has authored interpreter training curricula nationally including the Intercultural Parent and Youth Leadership Program, the Interpretation Academy for Bilingual High School Students, the Arkansas Interpreter in Education Credential Training, a 40-hour course for medical interpreters, and online courses for the University of Georgia, including the Professional Interpreter in Education Certificate course and the Professional Interpreter in Special Education Certificate course. Ana hopes to continue identifying ways to highlight the cultural wealth of multilingual families while supporting schools to strengthen cultural and linguistic bridges.

Session Abstract

Roughly 7,000 rare diseases/disorders have been identified as affecting humans. Medical, educational, and legal interpreters/translators should be aware of disorders that are less prevalent than those most often seen by most special education teachers and healthcare providers. A knowledge of lesser-known disorders will

increase translation/interpreting professionals’ ability to support students, patients, and families in schools and healthcare environments. An overview of Prader-Willi Syndrome, Turney Syndrome, dysphonia, and others will be provided with a focus on treatment and educational goals important for medical and educational interpreters and translators. Participants will leave with glossary-building resources and fact sheets for further learning.

Session 408


Amber D. Farrelly

Master Class in Legalese and Legal Terminology: from Lexically Distinctive to Ambiguously Rogue

Bio

Amber D. Farrelly, Attorney at Law, BEI Court Certified Interpreter, received her undergraduate degree from the University of Oklahoma and her Juris Doctorate from Arizona State University’s Sandra

Day O’Connor College of Law with the highest distinction for her pro bono work. Farrelly began her legal career clerking for both defense teams in the Yogurt Shop Murders shortly after their reversals in 2007 until both cases were dismissed in 2009. She began practicing as a criminal defense attorney in 2009 and has worked with the Innocence Project, Innocence Project of Texas, and the Texas Civil Rights Project. Farrelly is licensed in and practices throughout the state of Texas and in the U.S. Western District. She specializes in Deaf clientele and is a Board for Evaluation of Interpreters court-certified interpreter in American Sign Language (ASL). Working with the Conviction Integrity Unit in Dallas County, she testified as an expert witness on ASL and Deaf culture in the Stephen Brodie exoneration case—the only Deaf person exonerated in the United States. She consults and testifies in numerous cases involving Deaf individuals as an expert. Farrelly is a board member of the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association (TCDLA). She is the former president and current director of the Texas School for the Deaf Foundation Board. She is dedicated to and is an advocate for the Deaf. Farrelly received the Texas Society of Interpreters for the Deaf President’s Award in 2016. She was named Travis County Woman Lawyer of the Year for 2012. She has given numerous presentations and workshops on legal interpreting and Deaf rights. She has also been a guest on 48 Hours, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, Intersections Radio, and Legal Broadcast Network.

Session Abstract

We have all heard the term writ of habeas corpus. But really do we know what that means? And better yet, how do we interpret it?

One of the most challenging experiences for court interpreters is converting Legalese—the specialized and technical language of the legal profession—into meaningful, culturally-appropriate concepts. The field of law incorporates Latin, old-English common law concepts, and case law precedent that can challenge even the most knowledgeable and experienced court interpreter.

This workshop will be focused on understanding the meaning behind legal terminology and get to the heart of the concept. There are two kinds of legal vocabulary—1) words derived from the Latin, Greek, or French, which are often easy to recognize as being legalese, and 2) English words that are implicitly legalese, such as “consideration,” “information,” “motion,” and “brief.” Too often, we hear the Latin-root legal term and are lost at the meaning. When this happens, we often resort to a literal translation of the words or dropping it from the interpretation. Even more often, we hear legal words in English and interpret it according to the English, and not the legal meaning. In both instances, the meaning is lost and therefore not conveyed accurately.

Participants will be informed of relevant case law and Supreme Court decisions that have influenced Legalese and become part of the court’s vernacular. Cases such as Ake v. Oklahoma, Brady v. Maryland, Miranda v. Arizona, and Crawford v. Washington have become commonplace words in the criminal courtroom.

Participants will learn clear meanings of specialized vocabulary, or legalese, used by attorneys

during discussion with clients and during courtroom proceedings.

Those in the roles of proceedings interpreters will learn how to stream-line their interpretation so that communication during proceedings is effective. They will learn to better understand the meaning of specific terminology and thereby increasing the precision of their interpretation. Lecture, discussion, and example will be the primary methods of instruction for this presentation. The lecture will be given by a court- certified ASL, practicing criminal defense trial attorney who can speak directly to the point of criminal procedure, law, and conceptually accurate interpretation of legalese.

Session 409


Gabriela Espinoza Siebach and Giovanna Carriero Contreras

Educational Translation & Interpreting: Out of the Shadows and into the Spotlight

Bio

For over 30 years, Giovanna Carriero-Contreras has been a noteworthy leader in the language industry space. She is a published language industry author, trainer, national and international speaker. She co-authored The Community Interpreter© and The Medical Interpreter programs. She is a member of the ASTM Committee F43 on Language Services and Products, member of the Technical Committee for the revision of F2089-15 Standard Practice for Language Interpreting, Chief of US Delegation for the ISO/TC 37/SC 5 for translation, interpreting, and related technology standards, and editor of on the revision of ISO Standard 13611:2014 Interpreting — Guidelines for community interpreting. She sits on the Advocacy Committee and the Language Access Committee of the Association of Language Companies (ALC) and is incoming Chair (May 2022) of the American Association of Translators and Interpreters in Education. Giovanna Carriero-Contreras is the CEO of Cesco Linguistic Services, a company she conceptualized and launched as a foreign language agency and a conduit between Colorado's Limited English Proficiency residents and the service providers who tend to the needs of this growing population. Cesco provides linguistic services to many of the well-known and respected businesses serving legal, medical, insurance, workers compensation and community-based industries; leads and manages a pool of over 200 language professionals covering a wide range of languages from the most common to those of least diffusion. Since 2014, Cesco has grown well beyond Colorado and conducts business nationally and internationally. Giovanna was honored with the 2020 Bill Daniels Ethical Leader of the Year Award for her unwavering commitment to principle-based ethics in business despite and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic to promote language access for Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals. In addition to her role as Cesco’s Founder and CEO, Giovanna serves as Colorado’s Honorary Consul to Italy. She holds a BA from the Institute Universitario Orientale, Naples, Italy. She is a graduate of the School of Translation and Interpretation in Geneva, Switzerland; she speaks English, Italian, French and Spanish. She held positions in Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Gabriela Siebach, Conference Interpreting Services Manager at Cesco Linguistic Services, has accumulated more than 15 years of professional experience as a linguist, interpreter, translator, trainer, coach, and mentor. She has spearheaded the development of multiple training and assessment programs throughout her career. Gabriela holds a graduate degree in Spanish translation and interpretation from the world-renowned Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. A Board member of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care (2019-2021), she currently leads various Council initiatives as Chair of the Policy, Education & Research Committee. Gabriela also Co-chairs the Interpreting and Translation in Education Workgroup Job Task Analysis Committee.

Session Abstract

Certifications for court interpreters have been around for years, and two options now available for those working in healthcare. The interpreting profession in the U.S. is finally coming into its own; however, there are other critical areas still neglected—education being one of them. Over 20% of school-age children in the U.S. speak a language other than English at home, yet the demand for interpreters in education exceeds the pool of trained practitioners, causing a break in communication between families and educators, and students to fall behind. For the past 3 years, AAITE has led the way to promote the recognition and professionalization of educational interpreters and translators through the work of T&I professionals and administrators around the country, including the development of nationally-recognized best practices, a code of ethics and standards of practice, training and professional development, and a national certification program. Following the path of court and healthcare interpreting, the professionalization of educational T&I is finally here.

Session 410


Dr. Jeanne E. Kennedy

Medical Terminology for Interpreting a Chiropractic Examination or Testimony: Non-traumatic Shoulder Pain

Bio

Dr. Jeanne Kennedy has been in chiropractic practice since 2001. She specializes in Applied Kinesiology, which involved postdoctoral study in biomechanics, movement, and function of the human body. Jeanne has been a member of and student at the International College of Applied Kinesiology since 2004.

Jeanne’s workday is generally filled with patients looking for help with specific concerns, primarily spine and extremity injuries and functional problems, headaches, sleep issues, digestion concerns, and stress handling. She cares for people of all ages and in all stages of life. She is a first call for many of her established patients and she’s able to resolve their issues, keeping them from entering the medical system for chronic or low-grade injury conditions. Also, many who have already been through the medical system for their problem, but with mixed results, are able to make progress with her help. Her examinations draw from chiropractic, orthopedics, neurology, and general medicine.

She has years of experience with nutritional and herbal supplement therapies. Her skill in choosing an effective adjunctive supplement support for her patients is key. She works extensively with Standard Process, and was recently interviewed by them for a video series featuring eminent doctors who use their products in clinical practice

Session Abstract

An effective examination for non-traumatic shoulder pain includes observation of alignment, position, movement, proper muscular facilitation, and inhibition, as well as palpation of muscles, ligaments, relevant organs and glands, and lymphatics. The history of the condition and alignment will point to areas and planes of motion to assess.


OREGON SOCIETY OF TRANSLATORS AND INTERPRETERS

An Affiliate of the American Translators Association

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